On the Wings of Art (exhibit)

The Sun Herald described it this way:

Art lovers gathered Friday at the Jolly McCarty Depot Art Gallery, 504 Yon Ave., Pascagoula, for the opening of the Singing River Art Association’s spring art show titled “On the Wings of Art.”

Artists from across the Coast and beyond entered the show to compete for monetary prizes and awards. The show is on display during regular gallery hours through May 17. Judge for the show was Joan Daughtery, a well-known artist from Mobile, who also teaches art at her gallery.

I am grateful to Joan and the Association for choosing my painting entitled “Fishing Buddies” for the Excellence in Realism Award. Here is the painting:

Artists, Don’t Give Up

Rock Climbing

We artists go through periods of self-doubt and discouragement, especially when it seems nobody wants to purchase our art. We all know admirers who tell us that our work is very good (but they wouldn’t dare buy anything from us!). Artist Jack White always inspires with his Texas straight talk and razor-sharp wit. Here is an excerpt from his latest article. I hope it inspires you to stay tenacious and everlastingly at it, when it comes to achieving your breakthrough.

 

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Rejection

by Jack White

Whiteism: Rejection can be painful, but never fatal.

The single most powerful reason artists fail is FEAR of rejection. It’s impossible to be an artist and not experience rejection.

When I started writing I knew I would face multiple rejections. I remember reading the story of crime novelist John Creasey. John set a record of 742 successive rejection slips in a row before he was ever published. John received 500 more rejections than Stephen King before he was published. But once John’s first book was published, he wasted no time exploding on the market.[…]

Read the rest of this article at:
http://faso.com/fineartviews/54816/rejection

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This excerpt appears courtesy of FineArtViews Art Marketing Newsletter by FASO,
a free email newsletter about art, marketing, inspiration and fine living for artists,
collectors and galleries (and anyone else who loves art).

For a complimentary subscription, visit: http://www.faso.com/art-marketing-newsletter

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Do Art Organizations Matter Anymore?

Organizations
Photo Credit: Portland Development Commission via Compfight cc

Mark Edward Adams has an interesting take on whether or not art organizations have fallen behind the times in the age of Twitter and FB. I like his suggestions on how they can serve the individual artist better, also.

Do Art Organizations Matter Anymore?

by Mark Edward Adams

I think the prestige of the art societies was a casualty of the new culture of personal branding. In the past, there were a limited number of these groups and they had a lot of power. It meant immediate exposure and sales if your art won an award. However, with the emergence of social media it became very easy to start your own group or just ignore the art societies and promote yourself. Suddenly there were a lot more voices in the room and it became very difficult to distingush one from the other. […] 

Read the rest of this article at:
http://faso.com/fineartviews/49467/do-art-organizations-matter-anymore

———————————————-
This excerpt appears courtesy of FineArtViews Art Marketing Newsletter by FASO,
a free email newsletter about art, marketing, inspiration and fine living for artists,
collectors and galleries (and anyone else who loves art).

For a complimentary subscription, visit: http://www.faso.com/art-marketing-newsletter

———————————————– 

Which art gallery is right for me?

Choosing the right gallery to represent your art can be an exhaustive, time-consuming experience, but one that pays dividends in the end. Here are tips from gallery owners to help you navigate the gallery waters:

Art Gallery Representation: Some factors to consider. Part 4 – Experience

by Brian Sherwin

I have covered several factors with this series: distance, art pricing and materials. In this edition I will tackle another important factor – that being, experience. […]

Read the rest of this article at: http://faso.com/fineartviews/48406/art-gallery-representation-some-factors-to-consider-part-4-experience

———————————————- This excerpt appears courtesy of FineArtViews Art Marketing Newsletter by FASO, a free email newsletter about art, marketing, inspiration and fine living for artists, collectors and galleries (and anyone else who loves art).

For a complimentary subscription, visit: http://www.faso.com/art-marketing-newsletter

 

Morning vs. evening light

Sunset at the BeachI enjoy the long shadows of both morning and evening. I know that some artists like to paint the cool yellows of morning, but I am leaning more toward Charles Sovek’s preference of evening light. His point?

Warm afternoon sunlight

Moviemakers like to call the late afternoon light “magic time” I call it the best time of the day to paint. Why? Because, to me, the light at this time of day is at its most poetic position. While tints ranging from pink to orange reveal light-struck passages, luminous purples and blues, reflected from the sky, dance in the shadows. The cinematographers are right: Even a depressing slum can take on an inviting, never-never-land quality.

Another bonus of late afternoon light is the fascinating shadow patterns caused by the low position of the sun. While interesting shadows can also occur in early morning, it’s only in the late afternoon that the unbeatable combination of long, revealing shadows and warm, luminous color merge to create the most intriguing effects.

The Impressionists were probably the first artists to take advantage of this magical time of day. Spanish painter Joaquin Sorolla devoted practically his entire life to chasing after these effects. – Charles Sovek, Oct. 1984

Adding your fragment to the whole

One of my favorite poems is by Robert Henri.

All any man can do,
is add his fragment to the whole,
No man can be final,
but he can record his progress. . .
What he leaves is so much
for others to use as stones to step on,
or stones to avoid.
After all, the goal is not making art.
it is living a life.
Those who live their lives
will leave the stuff that is really art.

– Robert Henri, The Art Spirit