What words do you use to describe yourself?

Searching for the right word to describe yourself can be a challenging endeavor. -Illustration: Michael Brugh, for the South Bend Tribune
Searching for the right word to describe yourself can be a challenging endeavor.
-Illustration: Michael Brugh, for the South Bend Tribune

Master painter Jack White points out that how you describe yourself can easily follow you around, define your life, and your work trajectory. Check out his latest article:

Describe Yourself

by Jack White

Be truthful with yourself in coming up with the words that best tell us who you are. Above all, make sure people think of you as a LOVING HUMAN who cares for your fellow mankind. […]

Read the rest of this article at:
http://faso.com/fineartviews/87630/describe-yourself

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This excerpt appears courtesy of FineArtViews Art Marketing Newsletter by FASO,
a free email newsletter about art, marketing, inspiration and fine living for artists,
collectors and galleries (and anyone else who loves art).

For a complimentary subscription, visit: http://www.faso.com/art-marketing-newsletter

Invisible Progress (Jack White)

Master artist Jack White imparts some sage advice while reminding us that progress often occurs even when you least detect its presence.

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Invisible Progress

by Jack White

Practice doesn’t make perfect. It takes perfect practice to see improvement. […] 

Read the rest of this article at:
http://faso.com/fineartviews/86605/invisible-progress

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This excerpt appears courtesy of FineArtViews Art Marketing Newsletter by FASO,
a free email newsletter about art, marketing, inspiration and fine living for artists,
collectors and galleries (and anyone else who loves art).



For a complimentary subscription, visit: http://www.faso.com/art-marketing-newsletter

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Why Artists Fail

The hidden sun. Image courtesy of MorgueFile.com
The hidden sun. Image courtesy of MorgueFile.com

Jack White, the master painter, has some great advice for artists about what to do to avoid failing to sell your art. One of the first things is so obvious, but true: No one can buy your art if it is not out there in the world for them to see.

I’m taking this article to heart. I’ve just listed my oil painting, “Fishing Buddies,” for sale on my brand-new shop. Just click on the Buy My Art link at the top of this blog. I’ll be adding more art in the weeks and months to come.

In the meantime, here’s Jack’s article:

How Artists Fail
by Jack White

If you don’t take control of your marketing then blame no one but yourself when you get old and can’t move through the studio because of stacks of unsold art. You must change your attitude or fail. […]

Read the rest of this article at:
http://faso.com/fineartviews/85327/how-artists-fail

———————————————-
This excerpt appears courtesy of FineArtViews Art Marketing Newsletter by FASO,
a free email newsletter about art, marketing, inspiration and fine living for artists,
collectors and galleries (and anyone else who loves art).

For a complimentary subscription, visit: http://www.faso.com/art-marketing-newsletter

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My 3 words for 2015

Launch

Chris Brogan has been encouraging his readers and friends to come up with 3 words to describe their goals and intentions during the next year. He cautions against writing out long, drawn-out statements or resolutions, the theory being that we end up making vague statements such as “I am going to exercise more.”

In that light, my 3 words are:

  1. Simplify
  2. Magnify
  3. Multiply

Simplify: Stop expending energy in a dozen different directions, hoping something will stick. Sit down, plan a little, think about what motivates you, fires your passion, and pursue the artists, bloggers, musicians, filmmakers that are doing it the best. Search their “secrets” of success, and begin to develop your own good habits.

Magnify: Once you have settled on your focused goals, magnify your efforts to expose your art, idea, product, song or film to the world. I never gave it much thought to reach out to interior decorators as a source of income from my art, for example. I will now.

Multiply: Once income begins to flow in, double your efforts to provide more of the same art, music, product, coaching, or service to your very loyal fans and clients.

Go be successful!

Are you improving on nature, or honoring her?

Keith Bond of FASO reminded me of an aspect of painting I am just now realizing: Favorite locations in nature can be changed or altered as you paint them. I have often viewed a a scene in nature that I thought was a perfect painting, except for this tree, or that pond. Or maybe I said to myself, “A pond in that area would make this scene so much better.” What I am now realizing, is that I was exercising a natural function of we artists. Keith Bond has described the process in his article “Show Me Your Relationship with Her.”

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SHOW ME YOUR RELATIONSHIP WITH HER
by Keith Bond
How close you stay to (perceived) reality and how much you deviate and create something entirely new is completely up to you. But don’t be so tied to a literal depiction that you fail to see the possibilities of improving upon the design you see in nature. […]
Read the rest of this article at:
http://faso.com/fineartviews/57260/show-me-your-relationship-with-her
———————————————-
This excerpt appears courtesy of FineArtViews Art Marketing Newsletter by FASO,
a free email newsletter about art, marketing, inspiration and fine living for artists,
collectors and galleries (and anyone else who loves art).
For a complimentary subscription, visit: http://www.faso.com/art-marketing-newsletter
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Three creativity challenges to improve your art

Parasol (watercolor on paper, 16×24) by Keiko Yasuoka
Parasol (watercolor on paper, 16×24) by Keiko Yasuoka

Try freshening up your paintings and painting habits with these tips from artist Keiko Yasouka, courtesy of Cheri Haas, Online Editor of the Artist’s Network.

Three Creativity Challenges to Improve Your Art 

Keiko Yasuoka’s paintings take you to many places. Winter mountain ranges, a busy evening in San Francisco, a sublime bay with sailboats waiting for dawn to break, just to name a few. And these are just her landscapes.Her still life paintings are simply beautiful; and they vary in style, making an interesting collection of work. Keiko is featured in Watercolor Artist (February 2013). In case you haven’t bought your copy yet, I’d like to share her recommended creativity challenges that are meant to inspire you to take your work to new places.

Keiko’s creativity challenges

    
• Limit your palette when starting your next piece. Using three or four colors will help ensure harmony throughout your painting and strengthen your color-mixing skills.


 

    • Toss your photograph aside after you’ve blocked in the main elements of your painting. Because no photograph can accurately capture the colors found in nature, it’s best to rely on your knowledge and memory and just use the photograph as an occasional reference.

 

    • Try something different from your usual [art] workshops. Take a pottery class, work with mixed media for a month or break out your colored pencils. Having a range of experiences to draw upon can help you master techniques that are effective across media and subject matter.

Julie Gilbert Pollard is another talented artist who shares traditional watercolor painting techniques and tips for achieving a loose, painterly quality. Explore more in her book, Watercolor Unleashed: New Directions for Traditional Painting Techniques.

Which art gallery is right for me?

Choosing the right gallery to represent your art can be an exhaustive, time-consuming experience, but one that pays dividends in the end. Here are tips from gallery owners to help you navigate the gallery waters:

Art Gallery Representation: Some factors to consider. Part 4 – Experience

by Brian Sherwin

I have covered several factors with this series: distance, art pricing and materials. In this edition I will tackle another important factor – that being, experience. […]

Read the rest of this article at: http://faso.com/fineartviews/48406/art-gallery-representation-some-factors-to-consider-part-4-experience

———————————————- This excerpt appears courtesy of FineArtViews Art Marketing Newsletter by FASO, a free email newsletter about art, marketing, inspiration and fine living for artists, collectors and galleries (and anyone else who loves art).

For a complimentary subscription, visit: http://www.faso.com/art-marketing-newsletter

 

Morning vs. evening light

Sunset at the BeachI enjoy the long shadows of both morning and evening. I know that some artists like to paint the cool yellows of morning, but I am leaning more toward Charles Sovek’s preference of evening light. His point?

Warm afternoon sunlight

Moviemakers like to call the late afternoon light “magic time” I call it the best time of the day to paint. Why? Because, to me, the light at this time of day is at its most poetic position. While tints ranging from pink to orange reveal light-struck passages, luminous purples and blues, reflected from the sky, dance in the shadows. The cinematographers are right: Even a depressing slum can take on an inviting, never-never-land quality.

Another bonus of late afternoon light is the fascinating shadow patterns caused by the low position of the sun. While interesting shadows can also occur in early morning, it’s only in the late afternoon that the unbeatable combination of long, revealing shadows and warm, luminous color merge to create the most intriguing effects.

The Impressionists were probably the first artists to take advantage of this magical time of day. Spanish painter Joaquin Sorolla devoted practically his entire life to chasing after these effects. – Charles Sovek, Oct. 1984

Adding your fragment to the whole

One of my favorite poems is by Robert Henri.

All any man can do,
is add his fragment to the whole,
No man can be final,
but he can record his progress. . .
What he leaves is so much
for others to use as stones to step on,
or stones to avoid.
After all, the goal is not making art.
it is living a life.
Those who live their lives
will leave the stuff that is really art.

– Robert Henri, The Art Spirit