On the drawing board: Freda (update 4)

Graphite drawing of Michael Brugh.
Update number 4. I lightly filled out the rest of her fur, and began defining the window sill.

Freda now has a complete coat, except for the fact that it is a bit light. I'll accent that more later. At this point, I wanted to start to tie in the background to her, so I started building up the window sill with a combination of an HB woodless pencil and a 2H.

Daily Sketch (Red Reflection)

Red Reflection. I know, where's the red? Well, it is a rough sketch of an oil painting I plan to produce. The boat will have a red color scheme.
Red Reflection. I know, where’s the red? Well, it is a rough sketch of an oil painting I plan to produce. The boat will have a red color scheme.

I plan to produce this as an original oil painting. I am thinking of using a red color scheme for the boat trim. I will probably set it in early morning, so cool morning light is called for here.

Invisible Progress (Jack White)

Master artist Jack White imparts some sage advice while reminding us that progress often occurs even when you least detect its presence.

————

Invisible Progress

by Jack White

Practice doesn’t make perfect. It takes perfect practice to see improvement. […] 

Read the rest of this article at:
http://faso.com/fineartviews/86605/invisible-progress

———————————————-
This excerpt appears courtesy of FineArtViews Art Marketing Newsletter by FASO,
a free email newsletter about art, marketing, inspiration and fine living for artists,
collectors and galleries (and anyone else who loves art).



For a complimentary subscription, visit: http://www.faso.com/art-marketing-newsletter

———————————————– 

Freda, update 3

Freda in window, update number three. Still using the 2H woodless pencil, followed by a light covering of a HB pencil, I defined Freda's chest and darkened the window sill.
Freda in window, update number three. Still using the 2H woodless pencil, followed by a light covering of a HB pencil, I defined Freda’s chest and darkened the window sill.

Freda in window, update number three. I defined the chest area by lightly shading the sunbeam area on the window. Part of the window sill can be recognized now, and I have also deepened the body, and darkened parts of Freda’s head and side. Again, at this point, I am using a 2H woodless pencil and an HB pencil.

Freda, update 2

Michael Brugh
Freda in window, update number two. I began by defining the head and body with a 2H woodless pencil, followed by a light covering of a HB pencil.

Freda in window, update number two. I began by defining the head and body with a 2H woodless pencil, followed by a light covering of a HB pencil.

Why Artists Fail

The hidden sun. Image courtesy of MorgueFile.com
The hidden sun. Image courtesy of MorgueFile.com

Jack White, the master painter, has some great advice for artists about what to do to avoid failing to sell your art. One of the first things is so obvious, but true: No one can buy your art if it is not out there in the world for them to see.

I’m taking this article to heart. I’ve just listed my oil painting, “Fishing Buddies,” for sale on my brand-new shop. Just click on the Buy My Art link at the top of this blog. I’ll be adding more art in the weeks and months to come.

In the meantime, here’s Jack’s article:

How Artists Fail
by Jack White

If you don’t take control of your marketing then blame no one but yourself when you get old and can’t move through the studio because of stacks of unsold art. You must change your attitude or fail. […]

Read the rest of this article at:
http://faso.com/fineartviews/85327/how-artists-fail

———————————————-
This excerpt appears courtesy of FineArtViews Art Marketing Newsletter by FASO,
a free email newsletter about art, marketing, inspiration and fine living for artists,
collectors and galleries (and anyone else who loves art).

For a complimentary subscription, visit: http://www.faso.com/art-marketing-newsletter

———————————————–