Coach Walter J. Brugh: The Victor

Dad-blog

Pen and ink drawing of my dad, Walter Brugh, who coached football for 44 years at Paintsville (Ky) High School. Pen and ink illustration by Michael Brugh, 2006.

 

(Note: I am republishing this tribute I wrote of my father on the anniversary of his passing away, February 11, 2014. – MB)

A personal note, about my father, Walter James Brugh, Sr.

My father was a football coaching legend at Paintsville (Ky) High School. He played football for Paintsville, then fought in the Philippines during World War II. He returned home, graduated from Paintsville High School, then went on to play college football at The Citadel. He then returned home to coach Paintsville football from 1951 (as an assistant coach under Jim Wheeler; he became head coach in 1955) to 1994. He amassed a record of 280 wins, 136 losses, and 5 ties.

He is even in the 1993-94 Congressional Record.

This post does not even begin to list his accomplishments. Perhaps one day I will honor him with a proper site as a tribute to his enduring legacy. He passed up many chances to coach college football in favor of helping young boys become men. Men of honor, good character, and assets to their families, their team, their community, and their country. I am blessed and proud to be called Coach Walter Brugh’s son.

His way of motivating us to play hard and play our best began in the locker room. Before each game, he would have all the players, coaches, and managers, take a knee, while he performed two tasks: Reading C. W. Longenecker’s “The Victor,” and reciting the Lord’s Prayer.

We were all the better for it.

The Victor (by C.W. Longenecker)

If you think you are beaten, you are.
If you think you dare not, you don’t
If you like to win but think you can’t,
It’s almost certain you won’t.

If you think you’ll lose, you’re lost.
For out in the world we find
Success begins with a fellow’s will
It’s all in the state of mind.

If you think you are outclassed, you are.
You’ve got to think high to rise.
You’ve got to be sure of yourself before
You can ever win the prize.

Life’s battles don’t always go
To the stronger or faster man.
But sooner or later, the man who wins
Is the man who thinks he can.

My father passed away Feb. 11, 2014, at the age of 87. His spirit of excellence, his determination, his exuberance, his good character, lives on. It will live on in his family, his former players, coaches, managers, and teachers. He joins my beloved mother, Nancy, who passed away in May 2011.

I presented to Dad the above pen-and-ink drawing back in 2008. It was one of the few times I had ever seen my dad tear up. He was visibly moved by the gift. I am glad he was able to see it, and receive a small (indeed, a too-small token) of my love, affection and appreciation for him.

A kind remembrance of dad was written by my former teacher/librarian June B. Rice, and can be found here. Another article detailing his amazing life and career can be viewed here.

Day 29 – A Drawing a Day – Great Blue Heron

Day 29 - Great Blue Heron - graphite sketch by artist Michael Brugh

Day 28

“Great Blue Heron.”

One of my favorite shore and wading birds, it is also one of the largest of its kind.

 I welcome your comments!

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Painting “Sleepyhead,” step 5 (developing fur)

(Note: Did you miss Steps 1-4? Search for “Sleepyhead!”)

Step 5

Tackling the chin, shadows. I need to work on the shadow between the paws a bit more, but I am starting to see a nice contrast forming to the right of his eye. The floor reflection comes next. I am almost positive I will be tweaking the overall fur a bit more, too. 🙂

Let me know what you think of my painting by leaving a comment below. Thanks!

Painting “Sleepyhead,” step 4 (enhancing fur)

(Note: Did you miss Steps 1-3? Search for “Sleepyhead!”)

Step 4

I’ve let the painting dry a bit, so that I can utilize the “fat over lean” method of applying paint.

Moving away from ultramarine blue for a short time, I take some time to build up the softer passages in his cheek and shoulder with cadmium orange and permalba white, taking note of the subtle value change between the cast shadow and the light source highlighting his upper shoulder blade. This is where Photoshop or another image program can really help. When I convert the color reference photo to gray-scale, I can see the contrast shift changes without  color influencing the painting. Color can sometimes distort how much, or how little, contrast exists between the head and the shoulder.

I’ll be tackling the chin, shadows, and the floor reflection next. Let me know what you think of my painting by leaving a comment below. Thanks!

Painting “Sleepyhead,” step 3 (fur beginnings)

(Note: Did you miss Steps 1-2? Search for “Sleepyhead!”)

Step 3

Keeping the warm color scheme, I’ve moved on to the fur. Again, using a tiny bit of Ultramarine Blue and Cadmium Orange (I combine cadmium Yellow and Cadmium Red for this demonstration), I block in the general areas where the fur is orange. I will add detail later with a liner brush. Sleepy’s eye also gets added, using a mix of cadmium Yellow and Ultramarine Blue.

Painting “Sleepyhead,” step 2 (background)

(Note: If you missed Step 1, you can check it out here.)

Step 2

Using the suggestion of Mikki Senkarik, I work from background to foreground, opting for a warm color scheme throughout the entire piece. Using a mix of Ultramarine Blue and Cadmium Orange (I combine cadmium Yellow and Cadmium Red for this demonstration), Pull strokes up and down in the foreground, intending to show a semi-shiny floor with reflections.

Painting “Sleepyhead,” step 1

Step one of Michael Brugh's oil painting, "Sleepyhead."

Step 1

A new kitty. I liked the reflection of the orange and white cat on the smooth surface, plus the contrast between the warm bright colors and the darker background. I probably put more details in than I needed, but I invariably need more reference after I get started, and having it on the page is better. I can always simplify the drawing during the transfer to canvas.

“Blackie,” step 4 (finis)

Blackie, 6x6, oil, Michael Brugh, artist, 2016

Blackie, 6×6, oil

(Note: Updated with high-resolution scan of the painting. -MB)

Step 4

(Once again, apologies for the slightly out-of-focus photo.)

All done. I will upload a much better image of this painting once it has dried a bit more. I will be including this painting as the first in a series of cat paintings I am working on for C.A.T.S Gallery, in Mobile, AL. (Clever name, huh? It stands for Creative Artistic Treasures Studio.) They have a Facebook page, here, and, if you are in Mobile, AL, would love to have you stop by. Tell Shery that Michael said “Hi!”

“Blackie,” step 3 (fur)

Step 3

Sorry for the slightly out-of-focus photo. (Note to self: buy a decent SLR ASAP!)

Fur is coming along, but I am thinking that the bottom portion of the painting needs a little something. Drama, darkening? Tune in to step 4.

 

“Blackie,” step 2 (background)

Step 2

I got so caught up in mixing and painting that I finished the background before I remembered to take in-progress photos! Oh well, I am glad I snapped this pic, before I started on the fur. 🙂