Learn how to mix engaging grays

Grand Central Station Mosaic, © 2015 by David Dunlop.
Grand Central Station Mosaic, © 2015 by David Dunlop.

David Dunlop makes another essential point about effective painting, and that is, to master the use of mixing and painting grays. Jack White also made it a goal of his to master grays, in order to give the viewer’s eyes a place to rest, and keep the vibrant areas vibrant.

My key takeaway paragraph from David Dunlop’s post is this:

Let’s examine mixing colors to create luminous grays (or what is referred to as chromatic grays). A gray concocted from a triad of secondary colors and the use of white. They can be made to look warmer or cooler. These color based grays are usually more engaging than those made from black and white or Payne’s gray. Let’s see how it’s done by artists on their palettes and in their pictures.

Read the entire post here:
http://paintingclass.net/blog/chromatic-dust/

What words do you use to describe yourself?

Searching for the right word to describe yourself can be a challenging endeavor. -Illustration: Michael Brugh, for the South Bend Tribune
Searching for the right word to describe yourself can be a challenging endeavor.
-Illustration: Michael Brugh, for the South Bend Tribune

Master painter Jack White points out that how you describe yourself can easily follow you around, define your life, and your work trajectory. Check out his latest article:

Describe Yourself

by Jack White

Be truthful with yourself in coming up with the words that best tell us who you are. Above all, make sure people think of you as a LOVING HUMAN who cares for your fellow mankind. […]

Read the rest of this article at:
http://faso.com/fineartviews/87630/describe-yourself

———————————————-
This excerpt appears courtesy of FineArtViews Art Marketing Newsletter by FASO,
a free email newsletter about art, marketing, inspiration and fine living for artists,
collectors and galleries (and anyone else who loves art).

For a complimentary subscription, visit: http://www.faso.com/art-marketing-newsletter

Invisible Progress (Jack White)

Master artist Jack White imparts some sage advice while reminding us that progress often occurs even when you least detect its presence.

————

Invisible Progress

by Jack White

Practice doesn’t make perfect. It takes perfect practice to see improvement. […] 

Read the rest of this article at:
http://faso.com/fineartviews/86605/invisible-progress

———————————————-
This excerpt appears courtesy of FineArtViews Art Marketing Newsletter by FASO,
a free email newsletter about art, marketing, inspiration and fine living for artists,
collectors and galleries (and anyone else who loves art).



For a complimentary subscription, visit: http://www.faso.com/art-marketing-newsletter

———————————————– 

Why Artists Fail

The hidden sun. Image courtesy of MorgueFile.com
The hidden sun. Image courtesy of MorgueFile.com

Jack White, the master painter, has some great advice for artists about what to do to avoid failing to sell your art. One of the first things is so obvious, but true: No one can buy your art if it is not out there in the world for them to see.

I’m taking this article to heart. I’ve just listed my oil painting, “Fishing Buddies,” for sale on my brand-new shop. Just click on the Buy My Art link at the top of this blog. I’ll be adding more art in the weeks and months to come.

In the meantime, here’s Jack’s article:

How Artists Fail
by Jack White

If you don’t take control of your marketing then blame no one but yourself when you get old and can’t move through the studio because of stacks of unsold art. You must change your attitude or fail. […]

Read the rest of this article at:
http://faso.com/fineartviews/85327/how-artists-fail

———————————————-
This excerpt appears courtesy of FineArtViews Art Marketing Newsletter by FASO,
a free email newsletter about art, marketing, inspiration and fine living for artists,
collectors and galleries (and anyone else who loves art).

For a complimentary subscription, visit: http://www.faso.com/art-marketing-newsletter

———————————————–

A painting without light has no life

Photo Credit: Jack Skipworth via Compfight cc
Photo Credit: Jack Skipworth via Compfight cc



Another gem of an article from artist Jack White. How you paint light can make or break your piece, and quite possibly help your career along the way.

———–

Sluggish Sameness
by Jack White
I leave you with this challenge. Discover what light can do for your work. Take the dare to shed sameness and climb to the top of the heap. What do you have to lose by trying? You have much to gain. When you are successfully able to work light into your originals you will stand out for exceptional achievement. Believe me, if I can learn then anyone can. […]
Read the rest of this article at:
http://faso.com/fineartviews/67578/sluggish-sameness
———————————————-
This excerpt appears courtesy of FineArtViews Art Marketing Newsletter by FASO,
a free email newsletter about art, marketing, inspiration and fine living for artists,
collectors and galleries (and anyone else who loves art).
For a complimentary subscription, visit: http://www.faso.com/art-marketing-newsletter
———————————————–

Artists, Don’t Give Up

Rock Climbing

We artists go through periods of self-doubt and discouragement, especially when it seems nobody wants to purchase our art. We all know admirers who tell us that our work is very good (but they wouldn’t dare buy anything from us!). Artist Jack White always inspires with his Texas straight talk and razor-sharp wit. Here is an excerpt from his latest article. I hope it inspires you to stay tenacious and everlastingly at it, when it comes to achieving your breakthrough.

 

————–

Rejection

by Jack White

Whiteism: Rejection can be painful, but never fatal.

The single most powerful reason artists fail is FEAR of rejection. It’s impossible to be an artist and not experience rejection.

When I started writing I knew I would face multiple rejections. I remember reading the story of crime novelist John Creasey. John set a record of 742 successive rejection slips in a row before he was ever published. John received 500 more rejections than Stephen King before he was published. But once John’s first book was published, he wasted no time exploding on the market.[…]

Read the rest of this article at:
http://faso.com/fineartviews/54816/rejection

———————————————-
This excerpt appears courtesy of FineArtViews Art Marketing Newsletter by FASO,
a free email newsletter about art, marketing, inspiration and fine living for artists,
collectors and galleries (and anyone else who loves art).

For a complimentary subscription, visit: http://www.faso.com/art-marketing-newsletter

———————————————–