Daily Sketch (4-4-0 Steam Locomotive) update 5 (Finished!)

Michael Brugh artist. 1860s steam locomotive
My fifth and final update of my sketch of an 1860s-era steam locomotive, 4-4-0 configuration. © 2015 Michael Brugh

My fifth and final update of my drawing of an 1860s-era steam locomotive, 4-4-0 configuration. I am excited that a revival of sorts has been taking place in restoring some of these workhorses of our country’s past. The Leviathan, number 63, is one of these projects I have been following. In fact, I modeled this drawing after it.
David H. Kloke has lovingly created this locomotive over a 10-year period. From his website:

Of David’s many accomplishments through the years, the Leviathan63 is his pride and joy. His “hobby” took him 10 years to create and it “WOWS” everyone who sees and hears it. The Leviathan63 is truly a beautiful sight!

With the help of many a non-profit organization has been created named Historic Railroad Equipment Assoc. Through donations he hopes to rebuild and replicate several historic railroad equipment for educational purposes. He can make this possible with donations from people like you.

Here is video of no. 63, the Leviathan:

Daily Sketch (4-4-0 Steam Locomotive) update 4

My fourth update of a drawing I am working on of an 1860s-era steam locomotive, 4-4-0 configuration. Michael Brugh, artist.
My fourth update of a drawing I am working on of an 1860s-era steam locomotive, 4-4-0 configuration.

My fourth update of a drawing I am working on of an 1860s-era steam locomotive, 4-4-0 configuration.

Daily Sketch (4-4-0 Steam Locomotive) update 2

Artist Michael Brugh's pencil sketch of a 4-4-0 steam locomotive, circa 1860s. Update number 2 of a work in progress.
Pencil sketch of a 4-4-0 steam locomotive, circa 1860s. Update number 2 of a work in progress.

My update of a drawing I am working on of an 1860s-era steam locomotive, 4-4-0 configuration. I began defining the cowcatcher, headlamp and funnel, blending each with a combination of a 2B pencil, a 2H pencil, and a 6B pencil. I am not really a big fan of blending stumps, although I have used them in the past. I will probably use them again when I work on my series of portraits I have planned.

On the drawing board: Freda (update 5)

Michael Brugh's graphite drawing update number 5, of the cat Freda, using a General 9xxb pencil.
Freda’s coat is deepened by using a layer or two of a Kimberly 9xxb graphite pencil . I discovered the technique when I was looking for a way to create more contrast, and reduce the “shine” that regular graphite pencils make on paper. J. D. Hillberry suggested this pencil as a way to remedy that.

Freda's coat is starting to come together now. I start to show the dramatic lighting by beginning work on the blinds, plus her shadow. She is relieved to actually have a place to sit now!

On the drawing board: Freda (update 4)

Graphite drawing of Michael Brugh.
Update number 4. I lightly filled out the rest of her fur, and began defining the window sill.

Freda now has a complete coat, except for the fact that it is a bit light. I'll accent that more later. At this point, I wanted to start to tie in the background to her, so I started building up the window sill with a combination of an HB woodless pencil and a 2H.

Daily Sketch (Red Reflection)

Red Reflection. I know, where's the red? Well, it is a rough sketch of an oil painting I plan to produce. The boat will have a red color scheme.
Red Reflection. I know, where’s the red? Well, it is a rough sketch of an oil painting I plan to produce. The boat will have a red color scheme.

I plan to produce this as an original oil painting. I am thinking of using a red color scheme for the boat trim. I will probably set it in early morning, so cool morning light is called for here.

Freda, update 3

Freda in window, update number three. Still using the 2H woodless pencil, followed by a light covering of a HB pencil, I defined Freda's chest and darkened the window sill.
Freda in window, update number three. Still using the 2H woodless pencil, followed by a light covering of a HB pencil, I defined Freda’s chest and darkened the window sill.

Freda in window, update number three. I defined the chest area by lightly shading the sunbeam area on the window. Part of the window sill can be recognized now, and I have also deepened the body, and darkened parts of Freda’s head and side. Again, at this point, I am using a 2H woodless pencil and an HB pencil.