Daily Sketch (4-4-0 Steam Locomotive) update 5 (Finished!)

Michael Brugh artist. 1860s steam locomotive
My fifth and final update of my sketch of an 1860s-era steam locomotive, 4-4-0 configuration. © 2015 Michael Brugh

My fifth and final update of my drawing of an 1860s-era steam locomotive, 4-4-0 configuration. I am excited that a revival of sorts has been taking place in restoring some of these workhorses of our country’s past. The Leviathan, number 63, is one of these projects I have been following. In fact, I modeled this drawing after it.
David H. Kloke has lovingly created this locomotive over a 10-year period. From his website:

Of David’s many accomplishments through the years, the Leviathan63 is his pride and joy. His “hobby” took him 10 years to create and it “WOWS” everyone who sees and hears it. The Leviathan63 is truly a beautiful sight!

With the help of many a non-profit organization has been created named Historic Railroad Equipment Assoc. Through donations he hopes to rebuild and replicate several historic railroad equipment for educational purposes. He can make this possible with donations from people like you.

Here is video of no. 63, the Leviathan:

Daily Sketch (4-4-0 Steam Locomotive) update 4

My fourth update of a drawing I am working on of an 1860s-era steam locomotive, 4-4-0 configuration. Michael Brugh, artist.
My fourth update of a drawing I am working on of an 1860s-era steam locomotive, 4-4-0 configuration.

My fourth update of a drawing I am working on of an 1860s-era steam locomotive, 4-4-0 configuration.

Daily Sketch (4-4-0 Steam Locomotive) update 2

Artist Michael Brugh's pencil sketch of a 4-4-0 steam locomotive, circa 1860s. Update number 2 of a work in progress.
Pencil sketch of a 4-4-0 steam locomotive, circa 1860s. Update number 2 of a work in progress.

My update of a drawing I am working on of an 1860s-era steam locomotive, 4-4-0 configuration. I began defining the cowcatcher, headlamp and funnel, blending each with a combination of a 2B pencil, a 2H pencil, and a 6B pencil. I am not really a big fan of blending stumps, although I have used them in the past. I will probably use them again when I work on my series of portraits I have planned.

Learn how to mix engaging grays

Grand Central Station Mosaic, © 2015 by David Dunlop.
Grand Central Station Mosaic, © 2015 by David Dunlop.

David Dunlop makes another essential point about effective painting, and that is, to master the use of mixing and painting grays. Jack White also made it a goal of his to master grays, in order to give the viewer’s eyes a place to rest, and keep the vibrant areas vibrant.

My key takeaway paragraph from David Dunlop’s post is this:

Let’s examine mixing colors to create luminous grays (or what is referred to as chromatic grays). A gray concocted from a triad of secondary colors and the use of white. They can be made to look warmer or cooler. These color based grays are usually more engaging than those made from black and white or Payne’s gray. Let’s see how it’s done by artists on their palettes and in their pictures.

Read the entire post here:
http://paintingclass.net/blog/chromatic-dust/

Daily Sketch (Red Reflection)

Red Reflection. I know, where's the red? Well, it is a rough sketch of an oil painting I plan to produce. The boat will have a red color scheme.
Red Reflection. I know, where’s the red? Well, it is a rough sketch of an oil painting I plan to produce. The boat will have a red color scheme.

I plan to produce this as an original oil painting. I am thinking of using a red color scheme for the boat trim. I will probably set it in early morning, so cool morning light is called for here.

Freda, update 2

Michael Brugh
Freda in window, update number two. I began by defining the head and body with a 2H woodless pencil, followed by a light covering of a HB pencil.

Freda in window, update number two. I began by defining the head and body with a 2H woodless pencil, followed by a light covering of a HB pencil.

Why Artists Fail

The hidden sun. Image courtesy of MorgueFile.com
The hidden sun. Image courtesy of MorgueFile.com

Jack White, the master painter, has some great advice for artists about what to do to avoid failing to sell your art. One of the first things is so obvious, but true: No one can buy your art if it is not out there in the world for them to see.

I’m taking this article to heart. I’ve just listed my oil painting, “Fishing Buddies,” for sale on my brand-new shop. Just click on the Buy My Art link at the top of this blog. I’ll be adding more art in the weeks and months to come.

In the meantime, here’s Jack’s article:

How Artists Fail
by Jack White

If you don’t take control of your marketing then blame no one but yourself when you get old and can’t move through the studio because of stacks of unsold art. You must change your attitude or fail. […]

Read the rest of this article at:
http://faso.com/fineartviews/85327/how-artists-fail

———————————————-
This excerpt appears courtesy of FineArtViews Art Marketing Newsletter by FASO,
a free email newsletter about art, marketing, inspiration and fine living for artists,
collectors and galleries (and anyone else who loves art).

For a complimentary subscription, visit: http://www.faso.com/art-marketing-newsletter

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Which art gallery is right for me?

Choosing the right gallery to represent your art can be an exhaustive, time-consuming experience, but one that pays dividends in the end. Here are tips from gallery owners to help you navigate the gallery waters:

Art Gallery Representation: Some factors to consider. Part 4 – Experience

by Brian Sherwin

I have covered several factors with this series: distance, art pricing and materials. In this edition I will tackle another important factor – that being, experience. […]

Read the rest of this article at: http://faso.com/fineartviews/48406/art-gallery-representation-some-factors-to-consider-part-4-experience

———————————————- This excerpt appears courtesy of FineArtViews Art Marketing Newsletter by FASO, a free email newsletter about art, marketing, inspiration and fine living for artists, collectors and galleries (and anyone else who loves art).

For a complimentary subscription, visit: http://www.faso.com/art-marketing-newsletter