Painting “Shimmering Solitude,” step 6

Step 6

Oil Painting WIP, Shimmering Solitude, artist Michael BrughPainting “Shimmering Solitude,” step 6: I accentuated the darks, and I have begun defining the bow by adding some contrast in the harbor. Keeping it loose, I dabble some general shapes into the horizon below the skyline. Next, I will get serious about the reflections (one of my favorite subjects to paint).

How am I doing? Let me know in the comments below!

Painting “Shimmering Solitude,” step 2-5

Step 2

Painting “Shimmering Solitude,” step 2: I’ve added a light wash of cadmium yellow, mixed with a small amount of cadmium red tones the painting. I will follow it up by lightening the sky next.


Step 3
Step 3

Step 3 of my painting “Shimmering Solitude.” I have added a bit of light to the sky and the water reflection, using Permalba white.


Step 4

Step 4, “Shimmering Solitude.” Working in a few details, I’ve mixed up some gray using pthalo blue along with cadmium orange, and now, adding more detail to the sides and shadows.


 

Step 5

Step 5, “Shimmering Solitude.” Working in some color, I place cadmium red along the superstructure, and deepen some of the shadows.

Of course, the color selection is totally arbitrary; the original had a slightly different color scheme. Artistic license, you know. 🙂

What do you think so far? Let me know in the comments below!

Painting “Shimmering Solitude,” step 1

Shimmering Solitude, 6x6, sketch
My new 6×6 painting, “Shimmering Solitude,” begins as a sketch on canvas.

Step 1

This is the initial sketch on a 6-inch by 6-inch canvas. I decided to use the grid method to place the commercial boat on the 6 inch by 6 inch canvas.

The painting will depict a working boat, docked at the end of the day after a productive day on the job, providing jobs and food for their families and customers.

What are your thoughts? Let me know in the comments below!

 

Learn how to mix engaging grays

Grand Central Station Mosaic, © 2015 by David Dunlop.
Grand Central Station Mosaic, © 2015 by David Dunlop.

David Dunlop makes another essential point about effective painting, and that is, to master the use of mixing and painting grays. Jack White also made it a goal of his to master grays, in order to give the viewer’s eyes a place to rest, and keep the vibrant areas vibrant.

My key takeaway paragraph from David Dunlop’s post is this:

Let’s examine mixing colors to create luminous grays (or what is referred to as chromatic grays). A gray concocted from a triad of secondary colors and the use of white. They can be made to look warmer or cooler. These color based grays are usually more engaging than those made from black and white or Payne’s gray. Let’s see how it’s done by artists on their palettes and in their pictures.

Read the entire post here:
http://paintingclass.net/blog/chromatic-dust/

Invisible Progress (Jack White)

Master artist Jack White imparts some sage advice while reminding us that progress often occurs even when you least detect its presence.

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Invisible Progress

by Jack White

Practice doesn’t make perfect. It takes perfect practice to see improvement. […] 

Read the rest of this article at:
http://faso.com/fineartviews/86605/invisible-progress

———————————————-
This excerpt appears courtesy of FineArtViews Art Marketing Newsletter by FASO,
a free email newsletter about art, marketing, inspiration and fine living for artists,
collectors and galleries (and anyone else who loves art).



For a complimentary subscription, visit: http://www.faso.com/art-marketing-newsletter

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Freda, update 2

Michael Brugh
Freda in window, update number two. I began by defining the head and body with a 2H woodless pencil, followed by a light covering of a HB pencil.

Freda in window, update number two. I began by defining the head and body with a 2H woodless pencil, followed by a light covering of a HB pencil.

A painting without light has no life

Photo Credit: Jack Skipworth via Compfight cc
Photo Credit: Jack Skipworth via Compfight cc



Another gem of an article from artist Jack White. How you paint light can make or break your piece, and quite possibly help your career along the way.

———–

Sluggish Sameness
by Jack White
I leave you with this challenge. Discover what light can do for your work. Take the dare to shed sameness and climb to the top of the heap. What do you have to lose by trying? You have much to gain. When you are successfully able to work light into your originals you will stand out for exceptional achievement. Believe me, if I can learn then anyone can. […]
Read the rest of this article at:
http://faso.com/fineartviews/67578/sluggish-sameness
———————————————-
This excerpt appears courtesy of FineArtViews Art Marketing Newsletter by FASO,
a free email newsletter about art, marketing, inspiration and fine living for artists,
collectors and galleries (and anyone else who loves art).
For a complimentary subscription, visit: http://www.faso.com/art-marketing-newsletter
———————————————–

Are you improving on nature, or honoring her?

Keith Bond of FASO reminded me of an aspect of painting I am just now realizing: Favorite locations in nature can be changed or altered as you paint them. I have often viewed a a scene in nature that I thought was a perfect painting, except for this tree, or that pond. Or maybe I said to myself, “A pond in that area would make this scene so much better.” What I am now realizing, is that I was exercising a natural function of we artists. Keith Bond has described the process in his article “Show Me Your Relationship with Her.”

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SHOW ME YOUR RELATIONSHIP WITH HER
by Keith Bond
How close you stay to (perceived) reality and how much you deviate and create something entirely new is completely up to you. But don’t be so tied to a literal depiction that you fail to see the possibilities of improving upon the design you see in nature. […]
Read the rest of this article at:
http://faso.com/fineartviews/57260/show-me-your-relationship-with-her
———————————————-
This excerpt appears courtesy of FineArtViews Art Marketing Newsletter by FASO,
a free email newsletter about art, marketing, inspiration and fine living for artists,
collectors and galleries (and anyone else who loves art).
For a complimentary subscription, visit: http://www.faso.com/art-marketing-newsletter
———————————————–

Three creativity challenges to improve your art

Parasol (watercolor on paper, 16×24) by Keiko Yasuoka
Parasol (watercolor on paper, 16×24) by Keiko Yasuoka

Try freshening up your paintings and painting habits with these tips from artist Keiko Yasouka, courtesy of Cheri Haas, Online Editor of the Artist’s Network.

Three Creativity Challenges to Improve Your Art 

Keiko Yasuoka’s paintings take you to many places. Winter mountain ranges, a busy evening in San Francisco, a sublime bay with sailboats waiting for dawn to break, just to name a few. And these are just her landscapes.Her still life paintings are simply beautiful; and they vary in style, making an interesting collection of work. Keiko is featured in Watercolor Artist (February 2013). In case you haven’t bought your copy yet, I’d like to share her recommended creativity challenges that are meant to inspire you to take your work to new places.

Keiko’s creativity challenges

    
• Limit your palette when starting your next piece. Using three or four colors will help ensure harmony throughout your painting and strengthen your color-mixing skills.


 

    • Toss your photograph aside after you’ve blocked in the main elements of your painting. Because no photograph can accurately capture the colors found in nature, it’s best to rely on your knowledge and memory and just use the photograph as an occasional reference.

 

    • Try something different from your usual [art] workshops. Take a pottery class, work with mixed media for a month or break out your colored pencils. Having a range of experiences to draw upon can help you master techniques that are effective across media and subject matter.

Julie Gilbert Pollard is another talented artist who shares traditional watercolor painting techniques and tips for achieving a loose, painterly quality. Explore more in her book, Watercolor Unleashed: New Directions for Traditional Painting Techniques.